erikawastaken asked:

After you receive this you must share 5 random facts about yourself and then copy and send to your ten favorite followers :)

I also got tagged on my personal blog, so head over to see those random facts

  1. My current fitness hobbies are Running, Ballet, and Crossfit
  2. I’ve dabbled in Aerial Silks and Yoga, and I plan on adding those back into the rotation
  3. I currently only own two sports bras, a Nike and an UnderArmor
  4. I have a lingering back injury that’s currently keeping me from being active and it sucks
  5. My Deadlift PR is 190#
boyswanna-be-her

boyswanna-be-her:

the-exercist:

Reclaiming Fitspo: Jaqueline Ferreira

Ferreira is a Brazilian weightlifter. She stands at 5’5” and 163 pounds. She started lifting as a pre-teen, officially competing in student games when she turned 13. At that age, her natural talent and dedication to the sport was already drawing attention. 

In 2010, she was first in both Brazilian and South American heavyweight rankings. Twice, she successfully hit the Brazilian national record in the 69kg category, lifting 113 and 114 pounds. 

Now 27 years old, she competed in the 2012 London Olympics in the Women’s Heavyweight (-75kg) category. She exceeded expectations and ended up placing 8th with 230kg, getting beaten by the Polish Ewa Mizdal by only 1kg. 

Although her career is still blossoming, Ferreira is well worth keeping an eye on.

Click here to see all #Reclaiming-Fitspo profiles.

fucking fuck yes what a good campaign 

This run felt much better than yesterday’s run, so Opus before a run is out.
It also felt faster than normal, so this time I actually buy that I’m 1min faster than my usual time for this distance.
I did have to stop a few times but I feel like my recovery time is was faster than it used to be.
I felt a bit out of control of my breathing, but I think that’s something that will come back with time.
Overall, a good run :)

This run felt much better than yesterday’s run, so Opus before a run is out.

It also felt faster than normal, so this time I actually buy that I’m 1min faster than my usual time for this distance.

I did have to stop a few times but I feel like my recovery time is was faster than it used to be.

I felt a bit out of control of my breathing, but I think that’s something that will come back with time.

Overall, a good run :)

erikawastaken
chasefear:

Easy Run: These light runs are best done at a conversational pace. Meaning, if you can’t run and recap last night’s episode of “The Bachelor” at the same time, you’re going too fast!
LSD: Excuse me?! No, not that LSD. In this case, the acronym stands for long slow distance, or the week’s longest run. The only kind of trippin’ runners might be doing out on the road is over their own shoelaces.
Recovery Run: Also lovingly referred to as “junk miles,” a recovery run is a short, slow run that takes place within a day after a long, harder run. This teaches the body how to work through a fatigued state - a dress rehearsal many runners will be thankful for at mile 19 of a marathon!
Speedwork: Aimed at improving running speed, these types of workouts can include intervals, hill repeats, and tempo runs (all explained below). In addition to getting faster and increasing endurance, speedwork, well, usually hurts a lot, too!
Interval Training: By alternating specific time periods of specific high and low intensity during a run, intervals are just one way to get faster, build strength, and see calories melt away.
Hill Repeats: Runners make like Jack and Jill and go up the hill (again and again) in this other cruel form of speedwork. Heading up at a 5K pace and recovering down at an easy jog or walk, the number of hill repeats per workout depends on experience and fitness levels. But the benefits from the pain? Speed, strength, and confidence!
Fartleks: A fartlek not only makes us giggle, it’s an easier form of speedwork for beginners. Meaning “speed play” in Swedish, fartleks are easy runs broken up by quick sprinting bursts. When changing speed though, the runner calls the shots (unlike more rigid intervals). So newbies can make it as fast and as hard as they can handle. That’s what she said.
Tempo Run: Usually done just once a week, tempo runs are a tougher form of speed training. Runners challenge themselves to hold a “threshold” (or comfortably hard) pace for a 20-minute period during a run - along with a good warm-up and cool down, of course.
Pick-Ups: Short, gentle increases in speed, or pick-ups, at the end of a run help aid recovery. Sorry, they unfortunately have nothing to do with these cheesy lines.
Strength Training: Runners need muscles, too! Among its many other benefits, strength training, or exercises performed with or without weights (think push-ups, squats, and planks), helps runners become stronger and prevent injuries. Their bodies take quite a beating while hammering it out on the road, so they need all the help they can get.
Cross-training: Runners should also squeeze in time for cross-training, or sports and exercises other than running that improve overall fitness and strength. Great examples of cross-training for runners include cycling, swimming, yoga, water running, and weight training.
Rest Day: Choosing the couch over the road at least one day a week allows a runner’s body to recover and repair muscles. We say rest days can still be all about marathons though - a “Friday Night Lights” marathon, perhaps?

chasefear:

Easy Run: These light runs are best done at a conversational pace. Meaning, if you can’t run and recap last night’s episode of “The Bachelor” at the same time, you’re going too fast!

LSD: Excuse me?! No, not that LSD. In this case, the acronym stands for long slow distance, or the week’s longest run. The only kind of trippin’ runners might be doing out on the road is over their own shoelaces.

Recovery Run: Also lovingly referred to as “junk miles,” a recovery run is a short, slow run that takes place within a day after a long, harder run. This teaches the body how to work through a fatigued state - a dress rehearsal many runners will be thankful for at mile 19 of a marathon!

Speedwork: Aimed at improving running speed, these types of workouts can include intervals, hill repeats, and tempo runs (all explained below). In addition to getting faster and increasing endurance, speedwork, well, usually hurts a lot, too!

Interval Training: By alternating specific time periods of specific high and low intensity during a run, intervals are just one way to get faster, build strength, and see calories melt away.

Hill Repeats: Runners make like Jack and Jill and go up the hill (again and again) in this other cruel form of speedwork. Heading up at a 5K pace and recovering down at an easy jog or walk, the number of hill repeats per workout depends on experience and fitness levels. But the benefits from the pain? Speed, strength, and confidence!

Fartleks: A fartlek not only makes us giggle, it’s an easier form of speedwork for beginners. Meaning “speed play” in Swedish, fartleks are easy runs broken up by quick sprinting bursts. When changing speed though, the runner calls the shots (unlike more rigid intervals). So newbies can make it as fast and as hard as they can handle. That’s what she said.

Tempo Run: Usually done just once a week, tempo runs are a tougher form of speed training. Runners challenge themselves to hold a “threshold” (or comfortably hard) pace for a 20-minute period during a run - along with a good warm-up and cool down, of course.

Pick-Ups: Short, gentle increases in speed, or pick-ups, at the end of a run help aid recovery. Sorry, they unfortunately have nothing to do with these cheesy lines.

Strength Training: Runners need muscles, too! Among its many other benefits, strength training, or exercises performed with or without weights (think push-ups, squats, and planks), helps runners become stronger and prevent injuries. Their bodies take quite a beating while hammering it out on the road, so they need all the help they can get.

Cross-training: Runners should also squeeze in time for cross-training, or sports and exercises other than running that improve overall fitness and strength. Great examples of cross-training for runners include cycling, swimming, yoga, water running, and weight training.

Rest Day: Choosing the couch over the road at least one day a week allows a runner’s body to recover and repair muscles. We say rest days can still be all about marathons though - a “Friday Night Lights” marathon, perhaps?

This run was difficult for me, even though it was quite short. I took my Opus Magnum before I left, but I don’t think it helped at all.  My legs felt extremely heavy and tired after about 1k, so I’ll be skipping the Opus before my next run.
I really want to try to run every day.  Scotiabank Marathon is quickly approaching, and at this point I’m not sure if I’ll be able to do it.  I think if I work really hard I can make it happen, but I’m not going to register until I do a 16k run.
(Yay me for apparently shaving 1min off my time!)

This run was difficult for me, even though it was quite short. I took my Opus Magnum before I left, but I don’t think it helped at all.  My legs felt extremely heavy and tired after about 1k, so I’ll be skipping the Opus before my next run.

I really want to try to run every day.  Scotiabank Marathon is quickly approaching, and at this point I’m not sure if I’ll be able to do it.  I think if I work really hard I can make it happen, but I’m not going to register until I do a 16k run.

(Yay me for apparently shaving 1min off my time!)